UNESCO Sites in Romania

UNESCO Sites in Romania

Discover the most interesting tourist landmarks in Romania

Romania is a very rich country when it comes to UNESCO sites. From natural reserves to many sites with unique architecture, everything seems frozen in time and undisturbed by the rapid arrival of modernity. They are all greatly appreciated because they still look the same as they have for centuries, and here is a list of the most beautiful and intriguing UNESCO sites in Romania which any tourist should visit: 

  • The Danube Delta

The Danube Delta is a place where you can witness a unique and incredible ecosystem. It is perfect for bird watching, as it has a considerable number of species that have learned to live with what the Delta can offer them. To explore the beauties of the area, a boat is the best means of transportation since the Delta is filled with numerous water channels which take you through a world which seems to be from another time. Unique vegetation, amazing wildlife, the home of the world’s rarest fishes, and local traditions that can’t be found anywhere else . . . all this will mesmerise you.

Surdesti Church, Maramures

Surdesti Church, Maramures

  • The Wooden Churches of Maramures

If you are fascinated by local traditions and architecture, you must visit Maramures. It is located in the far north of Romania, and home of some of the most beautiful wooden churches in the world. These are Orthodox churches, very rarely Greek-Orthodox, and made entirely out of wood. They have survived in their essentially original condition for many centuries, and are the landmarks of this area. Their incredible architecture is now protected by UNESCO.

  • The Dacian Fortresses of the Orastie Mountains

Another area that holds a crucial piece of Romania’s history. A site where remains of the lost Dacian civilization, the ancestors of all Romanians today, can be seen. The fortress was built in the 1st centuries BC and AD, to protect from Roman invasions. It was a crucial spot in all battles between the Dacian and the Romans, and appears in all history books. There is a total of six fortresses, created by order of the famous ruler Decebalus. Most of them can be found in Hunedoara County, with only one being in the neighbouring county of Alba Iulia.

  • The Monastery of Horezu

If you have ever heard of the famous Romanian artist Constantin Brancoveanu, you should know that this monastery is one of his architectural masterpieces. The church is a rare beauty, containing elegant sculptures and decorative details, along with a large number of hand-painted portraits and other embellishments.

  • The Historic Centre of Sighisoara

Sighisoara is one of the oldest cities in the country, being founded in the 12th century. It is the birthplace of infamous Vlad III the Impaler (or Vlad Tepes as the Romanians call him), the ruler who was the beginning of the Dracula myth in Transylvania. The center of the city – the citadel – keeps its medieval air with its old and distinctive architecture. Every year a medieval festival happens here, where the habits and customs of past centuries are revived.

Sighisoara, Transylvania

Sighisoara, Transylvania

  • The Painted Churches of Moldavia

The churches you will see in Moldavia, the eastern part of Romania, are like no other. Suceava County has eight magnificent churches, built between 1487 and 1583. Moldavian rulers were very religious, and created a large number of churches across the county in order to offer aid and strength in battle. The churches remain in almost the same condition now as then, so it is extraordinary to see how they are decorated and how much effort was invested in their creation.

Daniel Gheorghita

Daniel Gheorghita

Managing Partner at Covinnus Travel
I love to travel, to discover new places, to meet new faces and make new friends. I like diversity and to learn new things, to understand the others, their culture, and their history. I'm passionate about photography and you can see my pictures at bydaniel.me
Daniel Gheorghita

Latest posts by Daniel Gheorghita (see all)

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*